Resurrecting Jefferson’s Bible

Thomas Jefferson was seventy-seven years old in 1820, when he sliced up Bibles in four languages and pasted the passages he liked onto both sides of forty-three sheets of paper, scrapbook-style, then sent those pages to his bookbinder, who created a single leather-bound volume now known as the “Jefferson Bible.”...

Read More

Features

Up Front

Going Anti-Postal

There was a time not too long ago when mantles lined with Christmas cards were as ubiquitous as Christmas trees, when birthdays bestowed us with similar arrays, when the letter carrier would regularly visit our homes...

Read More

Reviews

Elsewhere in the Humanist:

Vonnegut and Jefferson and Jesus

WE ARE NEARING another Indendence Day, for which much of the credit goes to Thomas Jefferson, a progenitor of modern American democracy. A bit farther away is another occasion worth noting. This November 11 marks one hundred years since the birth of...

Read All

Elsewhere in the Humanist:

Journeys to Humanism

This issue explores a variety of paths that people travel to find their way to humanism. The path for each person is different, and yet, they share a desire to find meaning and an ethical and rational means of addressing the challenges...

Read All

Elsewhere in the Humanist:

Why We Need More Black Humanists in Academia

THE NUMBER OF AMERICANS who identify as nonreligious has been steadily growing over the last decade. The Gen Z demographic, in particular, is more willing to identify as humanist and atheist than past generations. Greater numbers of youth are questioning religious teachings...

Read All

Elsewhere in the Humanist:

2021 Humanist of the Year, Dr. Anthony S. Fauci

The following is adapted from the presentation of the Humanist of the Year Award to Dr. Anthony Fauci at the American Humanist Association’s 80th Annual Conference in July 2021. Introduction by AHA Board Member, Jennifer Kalmanson I am pleased to present the...

Read All