Meet the New Intern: Marry Lim

Please welcome the American Humanist Association’s new communications and social media intern, Marry Lim!


TheHumanist.com: What is your educational and work background?

I’m currently attending New York University, majoring in international business management. This semester I’m studying at NYU’s Washington, DC, satellite site under the Global Leadership Scholars Program, where I’m engaging in leadership concepts and more. My previous work experiences have been a plethora of administration, marketing, and business operations-based internships in both the public and the private sector. I am always looking to grow my professional network and learn more about inspiring individuals who are actively trying to change the world for the better!

TheHumanist.com: How did you first learn about humanism?

Humanism is a concept I’ve learned about in several history classes I took for my liberal arts requirement. Beyond that, it’s a concept I’ve always thought about but didn’t know the right way to describe it. When I first learned about humanism, my thoughts made better sense to me since I’m a firm believer that every person in the world can constantly push themselves to be better every day, and humanism, at its core, is about improving the world through deliberate thought and action.

TheHumanist.com: Did you grow up in a traditional religious faith? How did it impact you?

I grew up in a conservative Theravada Buddhist household, which has helped me to see that every religion is beautiful in its own way, and that there are takeaways from every religion that help us become better people. This has helped me to see the beauty in humanism, a stance that places a certain importance and responsibility on human beings to give meaning to their own lives.

TheHumanist.com: What interested you most about working for the American Humanist Association?

Beyond AHA’s strategic location to my campus which allows me to maximize my time here in Washington, DC, I am compelled to learn more about how I can contribute meaningfully to the nonprofit sector and work on advocacy issues for an organization that seeks to maximize its impact on everyone in the world. I am interested in communications, and how it’s utilized in the world so it made sense to apply for this internship.

I also feel strongly about the United States having a clear barrier between church and state. I went to public school in New York and felt extremely uncomfortable reciting the Pledge of Allegiance every morning since it was mandatory. I’m supportive of AHA’s advocacy for church-state separation issues, and I’m drawn to some of the progressive stances that AHA has in general.

TheHumanist.com: What book has influenced you the most?

There isn’t one particular book that has influenced me the most, but one of my favorites that has influenced how I think is the book series  A Series of Unfortunate Events by Lemony Snicket. This series showed me that there are no black-and-white answers, that nothing is clear-cut, and that life is full of gray morality, where the morality of most actions is difficult if not impossible to ascertain.

TheHumanist.com: If you could have dinner with any three people in the world (living or dead), who would they be and why?

I’d like to have dinner with my grandparents from both sides. I never got a chance to interact with my grandma on my dad’s side since she passed on relatively early, and my maternal grandparents have passed away as well. It would be nice to engage since I don’t have many family members who I can talk to and get to know better.